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The Stars of the White Nights 2019
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14 December 2018 (Fri), 19:00 World famous Mariinsky Ballet and Opera - established 1783 - Stars of the Stars  Opera Giacomo Puccini . "Il tabarro. Suor Angelica. Gianni Schicchi" (one acts operas)

Running time: 3 hours 45 minutes (till 22:45)

The performance has 1 intermission

Book tickets for this performance Ticket prices before the discount: from US$ 109 to US$ 173 per ticket


Schedule for Giacomo Puccini . "Il tabarro. Suor Angelica. Gianni Schicchi" (one acts operas) 2018/2019

Soprano: Tatiana Pavlovskaya

Composer: Giacomo Puccini
Principal Chorus Master: Andrei Petrenko
Musical Preparation: Natalia Mordashova
Musical Director: Gianandrea Noseda
Stage Director: Walter Le Moli
Set Designer: Tiziano Santi
Costume Designer: Giovanna Avanzi
Lighting Designer: Claudio Coloretti
Conductor: Dmitry Ralko

Orchestra: Mariinsky Theatre Symphony Orchestra
Opera company: Mariinsky (Kirov) Opera

Opera in 3 act

Performed in Italian with synchronised Russian supertitles

Il tabarro

CREDITS

Musical Director: Gianandrea Noseda
Stage Director: Walter Le Moli
Set Designer: Tiziano Santi
Costume Designer: Giovanna Avanzi
Lighting Designer: Claudio Coloretti
Principal Chorus Master: Andrei Petrenko
Musical Preparation: Natalia Mordashova 
Children’s Chorus Master: Irina Yatsemirskaya

SYNOPSIS

The idea of performing three one-act operas in one evening, sharply contrasting in theme and mood, came to Giacomo Puccini as far back as 1900, after Tosca. At the time, his thoughts were consumed by one of the greatest books in the history of world culture – Dante’s The Divine Comedy. From people close to Puccini we know that when on trains he was never without his pocket-sized edition, and when talking he would often quote “eternal words”. “Hell”, “Purgatory” and “Heaven” seemed to him ideal material for a triptych. There were diverse reasons why he had to abandon the plan – as a result, essentially it is only Gianni Schicchi that is connected with Dante’s text (Hell, the thirtieth song). The remaining parts of the triptych – Il tabarro and Suor Angelica are based on literary works by other writers. 
Formally speaking, Il tabarro, Suor Angelica and Gianni Schicchi have nothing in common with one another, they are not united either by a common story or any other obvious ties. Perhaps that is why the composer never ceased to have doubts as to the justification for I  trittico. At the same time, if we immerse ourselves in the unique atmosphere of each of the parts, then a certain very broad meaning, unseen at a fleeting glance, nevertheless comes into view. Its roots bring it to the very forefront, while The Divine Comedy formed the basis of Puccini’s thoughts. 
It may be supposed that somewhere on a subconscious level in this work by composer the idea that runs through Dante’s book is reflected. The idea of moving from darkness through purification to light. Then Il tabarro with its predominant cruelty and hopelessness may be likened to Hell. Suor Angelica, like a tale of mortal sin and of salvation through Divine forgiveness, brings us to the idea of purification, and Gianni Schicchi is a hymn to a joyful disposition, unusual for Puccini, giving rise to a dream of Heaven on Earth. 
Viktor Borovsky

 

Early evening. Towards sunset. The banks of the River Seine. 
A barge is moored next to the bank. 

The barge-owner Michele is sullenly staring into space. His wife Giorgetta is busy with domestic chores. Michele stands and leaves in silence. The weary stevedores unload sacks from the barge onto the quay. Giorgetta offers them a glass of wine. Luigi, Tinca and Talpa accept with grateful pleasure. Luigi calls to a passing organ-grinder to play a tune. The latter obliges them with a waltz (reminiscent of Stravinsky’s Pétrouchka), and first Tinca then Luigi dance with Giorgetta. Returning to the barge, Michele brusquely breaks up the merriment. A ballad-seller appears on the quay and entertains a group of local girls (The Story of Mimì – yet another reference, this time to Puccini’s La Bohème). Giorgetta converses awkwardly with Michele. She is troubled by her husband’s gloomy mood. 
La Frugola comes aboard the barge in search of her husband Talpa. She sings about her cat and chatters away cheerfully with the others, chiding Tinca about his drinking habits. The stevedores leave for home, having finished their work. Talpa and La Frugola dream of a little cottage in the country and a quiet and peaceful existence – all the time knowing that they have no money to bring their dream to life. Giorgetta, too, attempts to escape from her bleak reality. As if in a dream, she sees the bustle of merry and carefree Parisian life. 
At last, all depart and Giorgetta and Luigi are now alone. With their very first remarks it becomes immediately plain that they are clandestine lovers. The electric atmosphere is then interrupted as Michele appears on deck. He is taken aback to see Luigi still there. The youth tells his boss that he remained behind on purpose. He has a favour to ask: when the barge reaches Rouen he wishes to go ashore and leave his job. This pacifies Michele and he asks Luigi not to be hasty with his decision. The lovers are left alone once more and Giorgetta discovers the reason for Luigi’s resolution: he can no longer bear the thought of sharing her with someone else – he would rather kill her than let a rival have her. It may be dangerous to continue talking, so Giorgetta appoints a meeting later that night. When all is quiet she will strike a match. This is her usual signal and he knows it well. Giorgetta mournfully contemplates the difficulty of finding real happiness. Michele suddenly reappears. He truly wishes to understand why Giorgetta has fallen out of love with him and tries to reignite her former affection and desire. He implores her to recall the joy their love once brought them. He reminds her how he used to wrap her and their sadly now dead child beneath his cloak. But Giorgetta has no time for memories. Feigning tiredness, she coolly informs him she is going to sleep. Michele is now convinced that Giorgetta has a lover. But who? Going through the names of the men who work for him, he cannot come to any conclusion. Least of all he suspects Luigi, who has just asked to be set ashore in Rouen. 
Still brooding, Michele lights his pipe and, seeing the flame which he takes to be the pre¬arranged signal from Giorgetta, Luigi hastens aboard the barge. Seizing him by the throat, Michele succeeds in forcing him to admit what he was afraid to hear. Mad with fury, he strangles Luigi and hides the body under the cloak. Alarmed by the noise, Giorgetta returns on deck. Her attitude has changed. She is no longer distant to him – the reverse, she asks her husband to enfold her as he used to do in his cloak, once a symbol of their inviolable union and a shield from the blows of fate. Michele draws back the cloak, and Luigi’s corpse rolls towards Giorgetta’s feet. Thrusting his wife to the deck, Michele forces her face against that of her dead lover.

 

Premiere of this production: 17 April 2003, Mariinsky Theatre, St Petersburg

Running time: 50 minutes

 

Suor Angelica

CREDITS

Musical Director: Gianandrea Noseda
Stage Director: Walter Le Moli
Set Designer: Tiziano Santi
Costume Designer: Giovanna Avanzi
Lighting Designer: Claudio Coloretti
Principal Chorus Master: Andrei Petrenko
Musical Preparation: Natalia Mordashova 
Children’s Chorus Master: Irina Yatsemirskaya

SYNOPSIS

The idea of performing three one-act operas in one evening, sharply contrasting in theme and mood, came to Giacomo Puccini as far back as 1900, after Tosca. At the time, his thoughts were consumed by one of the greatest books in the history of world culture – Dante’s The Divine Comedy. From people close to Puccini we know that when on trains he was never without his pocket-sized edition, and when talking he would often quote “eternal words”. “Hell”, “Purgatory” and “Heaven” seemed to him ideal material for a triptych. There were diverse reasons why he had to abandon the plan – as a result, essentially it is only Gianni Schicchi that is connected with Dante’s text (Hell, the thirtieth song). The remaining parts of the triptych – Il tabarro and Suor Angelica are based on literary works by other writers. 
Formally speaking, Il tabarro, Suor Angelica and Gianni Schicchi have nothing in common with one another, they are not united either by a common story or any other obvious ties. Perhaps that is why the composer never ceased to have doubts as to the justification for I  trittico. At the same time, if we immerse ourselves in the unique atmosphere of each of the parts, then a certain very broad meaning, unseen at a fleeting glance, nevertheless comes into view. Its roots bring it to the very forefront, while The Divine Comedy formed the basis of Puccini’s thoughts. 
It may be supposed that somewhere on a subconscious level in this work by composer the idea that runs through Dante’s book is reflected. The idea of moving from darkness through purification to light. Then Il tabarro with its predominant cruelty and hopelessness may be likened to Hell. Suor Angelica, like a tale of mortal sin and of salvation through Divine forgiveness, brings us to the idea of purification, and Gianni Schicchi is a hymn to a joyful disposition, unusual for Puccini, giving rise to a dream of Heaven on Earth. 
Viktor Borovsky

 

A spring evening in the garden of a convent. 
Sister Angelica, the daughter of a noble Florentine family, has taken the veil in order to atone for her sin: an illicit passion when young which resulted in the birth of an illegitimate child. Seven years have passed, though she is unable to forget her son. 
The strains of an Ave Maria can be heard from the convent chapel. A group of nuns emerges from the chapel after the service. The Monitress admonishes those who are late for vespers. For missing the service they will be punished and the latecomers enter the convent in order to fulfil the wishes of the Monitress. 
Sister Genovieffa observes that the fountain is on the verge of turning gold from the rays of the setting sun as it always does for three evenings during May, a sign of divine grace from the Blessed Virgin Mary. A melancholy moment follows as the nuns recall a sister who died a year ago. Sister Genovieffa suggests that “Perhaps her soul might desire a libation from the fountain?” Answering her question, Sister Angelica declares that desires only come to fruition for the living – the dead have already fulfilled their earthly purpose and their destinies cannot be changed. Displeased with the theme of the conversation, the Monitress reminds them that, as nuns, all desires are forbidden to them. Sister Genovieffa begs to differ: she, for example, yearns to hold a pet lamb. And yet another sister has a wish. The nuns laughingly reply that it must be for something tasty to eat. Drawn into the conversation, to the amazement of all Sister Angelica denies wishing for anything. Their surprise is easily explained – all know that she has been craving news from her family – that same family which forced her to take the veil. 
The Nursing Sister rushes in, much distressed: a nun has been stung by a wasp and is in great pain. Angelica swiftly prepares a herbal remedy. The Nursing Sister leaves, praising Angelica’s skill. Two Alms Sisters appear. They mention that a magnificent carriage with a coat-of-arms has arrived at the convent. The Abbess enters and summons Sister Angelica into the hall. Some important visitor has arrived. Before her, Sister Angelica sees her aunt the Princess. The latter exudes coolness and severity. She has come to demand that her niece sign away her share of the family heritage in favour of a younger sister. Her fiancé is willing to overlook the dishonour Angelica brought upon the noble household’s reputation. She must pay, in part at least, for her actions. Unmoved by Angelica’s protests and desperate enquiries about her son, the Princess brutally informs her that her son died two years previously. 
The document is signed and the Princess departs. Grieving in the utmost despair, Angelica begs for divine mercy. The nuns proceed to their cells. Angelica follows but then returns to prepare a lethal draught distilled from herbs and flowers. Bidding a tender farewell to the sisters, Angelica swallows the poison but is suddenly overcome by guilt at having committed the mortal sin of taking her own life. Again she prays to the Virgin Mary for salvation. Her prayer is answered. Angelica’s young son approaches his mother and kisses her.

 

Premiere of this production: 17 April 2003, Mariinsky Theatre, St Petersburg

Running time: 55 minutes

 Gianni Schicchi 


Libretto by Giovaccino Forzano
Gianni Schicchi is an opera in one act by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Giovacchino Forzano, based on a story that is referred to in Dante's The Divine Comedy. It is the third of the trio of operas known as Il trittico. First performance: Metropolitan Opera, New York City, 1918.

The opera is best known for the soprano aria, O mio babbino caro ("Oh, my dear daddy"), which has featured in a number of movies and other works.

Literary sources
Gianni Schicchi is only briefly referred to in Dante's Inferno. Canto XXX:

E l'Aretin che rimase, tremando,
mi disse: 'Quel folletto e Gianni Schicchi,
e va rabbioso altrui cosi conciando.'
(And he of Arezzo, pausing, trembling,
told me, "That madman is Gianni Schicchi,
who gnaws the other in his raving.")
The text states that Schicchi

per guadagnar la donna de la torma,
falsificare in se Buoso Donati,
testando e dando al testamento norma
(to gain for himself the fairest of the stud,
impersonated Buoso Donati,
making a will in proper form.)
That grim vignette is not the real source of the opera's action. A work entitled, "Commentary on the Divine Comedy by an Anonymous Florentine of the 14th Century", first published in 1866, elucidating Dante's terse references, is the actual source to the familiar plot set-up. In this, Buoso has wished to make a will, but was put off with words by his son, Simone. Once it is too late, Simone fears that Buoso may have made a will before his illness, unfavorable to Simone. Simone calls on Schicchi for counsel, and Schicchi coins the idea of the impersonation. Simone promises Schicchi he will be well rewarded, but Schicchi takes no chances, "leaving" a hefty sum to himself (though most goes to Simone), including the mule, and makes the bequests conditional on Simone's distributing the estate within fifteen days, otherwise everything shall go to charity.

Dante was no doubt somewhat biased in his description, having married into the Donati family himself, marrying Gemma Donati in 1295, five years after the death of his adored Beatrice

Synopsis
Place: Florence.
Time: 1299.
Buoso Donati has died in bed. His relatives mourn melodramatically, until they hear the rumor that he has left all his money to the local monastery. They frantically search for the will. Rinuccio finds it, but refuses to release it to his aunt Zita until she agrees to his terms. If the will is favorable to them, she must allow him to marry Schicchi's daughter, Lauretta. Schicchi is looked down on by the Donati family since he is a relatively new arrival in Florence. Zita consents (she does not care who Rinuccio marries so long as the will leaves them rich), and reads the will, as Rinuccio quietly sends for Schicchi. When the will confirms the rumor, everyone is furious. They refuse to allow Rinuccio to marry, and angrily turn down his suggestion that Schicchi, who is known for his clever schemes, can aid them.

Schicchi and Lauretta arrive to a cold reception. Schicchi, seeing how downcast the relatives are, uncharitably assumes that Donati must be better. He is informed otherwise, and attempts to console the relatives by mentioning their inheritances. Zita, touched to the quick by Schicchi's condolences, angrily explains the situation, and refuses to hear of a marriage. Rinuccio begs Schicchi to help. However, Schicchi, angered by his reception, refuses to help such people. He is persuaded to try by his daughter (O mio babbino caro). Schicchi reads the will, and proclaims that nothing can be done. But then, he has a thought, and Schicchi sends his daughter away so that she may be innocent of the knowledge of what he will suggest. Schicchi first orders the body to be moved to another room, and tells the women to make up the bed. He ensures that no one else knows of the death--but before he can explain, Donati's doctor arrives. The doctor is prevented from entering by the relatives, while Schicchi imitates Donati's voice, telling the doctor that Donati is feeling better. The doctor departs, praising his own skill. Schicchi explains: Schicchi will impersonate Donati and dictate a new will.

Rinuccio goes to get the notary. The relatives agree on the division of the property, except for Donati's mule (the best in Tuscany), mills, and house. They agree to let Schicchi decide who will inherit those items, but, one by one, they return to promise him a reward if he selects that person. Schicchi agrees to each bribe--but then reminds all of the penalty for forgery--loss of a hand and permanent exile from Florence. The notary arrives, with the witnesses. Schicchi dictates a very modest funeral, a minuscule sum to the monastery, and the agreed-upon division, as the relatives speak approvingly. But one by one, Schicchi grants the mule, mills, and house to himself, to the relatives' outrage. After the notary leaves, he throws everyone out, and they are helpless to do anything except grab what they can on the way out the door. Now that Schicchi can give Lauretta a dowry, there is no obstacle to her marriage to Rinuccio. The lovers embrace, as Schicchi watches, moved. Schicchi turns to the audience and asks if this was not a fine use of Donati's money. He then requests the audience's indulgence, even if he did not receive Dante's, pleading extenuating circumstances.

Noted arias
"Firenze e come un albero fiorito" - Rinuccio
"O mio babbino caro" (Oh, my dearest papa) - Lauretta
"Si corre dal notaio" - Gianni Schicchi





Book tickets for this performance

Schedule for Giacomo Puccini . "Il tabarro. Suor Angelica. Gianni Schicchi" (one acts operas) 2018/2019


Gianni Schicchi
 
About This Video
45:45
Mariinsky theatre.Opera "Gianni Schicchi" by G.Puccini. Springtime of 2008.
Conductor -Valery Gergiev
Director-Alexander Zeldin
Cast:
Gianni- Vladimir Samsonov
Lauretta-Olga Trifonova
Rinuccio-Oleg Balashov
Gerardo-V.Vihrov
Nella-M.Alaverdian
Zitta- N.Vasileva
Simone-V.Luhanin
Marco-V.Tulpanov
Ciesca-E.Sommer
Betto-A.Gerasimov
Notaro-E.Ulanov


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